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Wowzer is WebAssembly cool!

WebAssembly is an exciting technology that is advancing the web in new and interesting ways. It opens up all sorts of possibilities and additional languages to target the browser that were previously not possible before. If you’re not familiar with WebAssembly , let’s do a lighting intro and then dive into the ways we can leverage this fantastic feature.

WebAssembly , or Wasm for short, let’s us deliver compiled code to the browser that can parse and execute leaps and bounds faster than our bundled JavaScript can. But don’t worry, it’s not going to replace JavaScript or great tooling like Webpack or Babel. It’s here to supplement and help with the heavy lifting to make our web apps run at almost native speeds! Today we can write C or Rust code that with compile to Wasm and be able to interact with our existing JavaScript web applications improving developer and user experience alike.

Great use cases for leveraging the power of Wasm could be anything that is computationally heavy to be done in the browser rather than server side. Like gaming engines, image shaders or manipulation. You might be using Wasm today and not even know. Popular tooling library source-map, that lets developers match exact source files from their bundled output, is now up to 5 times faster by replacing a couple of the most intensive mapping portions of the library with Wasm! If this has piqued your interest and want to explore WebAssembly in further detail check out the resources below. If you’re already using Wasm I’d love to hear details of implementing it the good and the difficult.

Jesse Tomchak

September 2019

Are We There Yet

With another day comes another company making a push for more podcasts in it’s lineup. Today that’s iHeart Radio

From The Verge

iHeartMedia will harness more than 850 radio stations to build its podcast audience and entice potential advertisers. The company today announced Sunday Night Podcasts, in which 270 stations will play a prerecorded podcast episode in between music or talk radio. The initiative will bring podcasts to the airwaves in every one of iHeart’s markets.

I like the idea of using other avenues besides the ‘podcast app’ to expose people to podcasts as a medium. I have friends and family that continue to listen to FM radio to this day, even with dozens of other options, their car is tuned into some random station I don’t know. They are unlikely to fire up their podcast app and find something interesting to listen to. This might be a soft sell that gets them over the hump? I guess we’ll see.

August 2019

Apple Arcade will likely be priced at $4.99 per month.

From 9To5Mac

According to a promotional message found in the service, the price for Apple Arcade will be $4.99 / month, including a one-month free trial. As Apple previously announced, the service will allow access to all members in a Family Sharing account.

If this is the case, I’m all in. I would have been in the fence about it at $10. That compounded with the Switch Lite at a lower price is gonna make gaming at my house with young kids awesome for everyone !!!!!

August 2019

Broadband Is Not A Stump Speech

Buttigieg isn’t the only Democratic candidate calling for more broadband in rural areas. Last week, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) announced her big broadband plan that would include an $85 billion grant program for nonprofits and local governments to build their own networks.

Pete Buttigieg rolls out $80 billion plan to improve rural broadband

It would be great if this sort of talk actually made it through election cycles. Like so man promises before it, ISP’s have and will continue to spend millions of dollars annually to keep their respective monopoly on providing subpar internet to rural Americans. 😢 Making promises like these nothing more than campaign rhetoric.

August 2019

What to expect from tomorrow’s antitrust hearing featuring big tech

Facebook agrees to some kind of privacy law, which for some reason is very hard for new entrants to adhere to. Amazon may try and instantiate itself as basically the national e-commerce monopolist, kind of like a Bell-regulated monopoly.

Jonathan Shieber for Tech Crunch

When I hear big tech companies say, “we’d love government regulation” what I hear is something similar to what Jonathan points out. That monopolist regulation that makes it even more difficult for new or existing companies to compete, further entrenching these big companies.

the focus should be less on the global ambitions of these technology companies and more on the practices they’ve enacted to stifle competition.

We’ll see if congress can keep their eye on the ball, but I wouldn’t hold my breath.

July 2019

Starbucks feels like a digital library for those that can can afford $5 coffee. I tend to see more people on their device or sharing content then anything else.

July 2019

So the cross posting from here wasn’t working, and it wasn’t until I figured out that the RSS feed didn’t have the updated URL scheme that the rest of the site has. 🤦‍♂️ It was only setup to populate the post slug, missing the month and year path.

July 2019

Facebook denies allegations that you make friends on Facebook

Facebook also denies that it collects, records, and maintains data on users’ “information and activity,” though it does admit that “users can provide Facebook with certain information.”

Facebook denies allegations that you make friends on Facebook

It is strange to me that anyone could say this, much less write it up in an official legal document, with a straight face.

July 2019

Zoom saved you a click—by giving you a security hole

And then Apple comes along and introduces a security feature to Safari that requires a confirmation click when any link in a web browser attempts to open an external app. Zoom, which likes to pass around web links as a way of driving users into conference calls, didn’t look at this security measure as something to help keep their customers secure—it viewed it as an addition of friction by the platform owner.

Zoom saved you a click—by giving you a security hole

Jason Snell is able to very articulately sum up the events and motivation behind Zoom creating a locally running server, and believing that it was ok to do in the first place.

July 2019

Find the truth. Tell the truth.

This is important, because when digital projects fail, it’s often not the technology, but the underlying culture that sets the precedence for success or failure. Operating inside a culture of fear will inevitably lead to digital project failure.

Find the truth. Tell the truth.

This really echos my sentiment. That technology is the easy part, the people and the culture are the really tough challenges.

July 2019